Elk in Rocky Mountain National Park
 

Special Event Permit Detail

Application Information

ID: 717   Event: Collection and monitoring of Aquilegia coerulea var. daileyae
Status: APPROVED
Application Date: 05/28/2013    Event Date: 06/24/2013   Thru: 06/28/2013
Contact 1 Name: Scott Hodges
Address: Dept. Ecol & Evol., Univ. of Calif
Santa Barbara CA 93106
Email: Send email
Contact 2 Name:
Address:

Email:


Event Information

Permit Type(s): Parks and Open Spaces
Type of Event: Research
Location:
Hermit Park Open Space

Description:
We would like to observe pollination of and collect samples from Aquilegia coerulea var. coerulea and Aquilegia coerulea var. daileyae in Hermit Park. My graduate student, Nathan Derieg and I applied for a permit in 2011 but, unfortunately we learned too late in the season about this population and could not get it collected that year.

Aquilegia coerulea var. daileyae is an unusual variety of the species where the normally long-spurred petals are replaced by a set of sepals. Thus the flowers of this variety have 10 sepals instead of the normal five and completely lack petals. We have studied a population from Reynolds Park (Jefferson Co.) where the variety is locally relatively abundant. We have also found the variety occasionally in other locations, particularly in Jefferson Co. We have identified what we think is the gene (and even the specific mutation) that causes the difference in flower types in the Reynolds Park population. Our genetic data also suggest that the two varieties no longer mate with one another at Reynolds Park. This may not be surprising as normally, pollinators probe the long spurs gathering nectar which causes pollination. Without nectar spurs, the var. daileyae may have a very different method of pollination.

As mentioned above, we became aware that Hermit Park also harbors a population of Aquilegia coerulea var. daileyae in 2011. We would like to sample this population to determine if it has the same or a different mutation causing the change in flower morphology and if the same consequences to mating patterns is occurring. Such findings would be very significant scientifically as they would indicate a new species.

Sampling:
This requires us to sample 1-3 leaflets for DNA analysis from each plant. Depending on the size of the population, we would like to collect from 30-50 individuals with each morphology. This is a very small amount of tissue and should not negatively affect the plants. This tissue will allow us to determine which parts of their DNA differ between the varieties and if the two varieties in Hermit Park are mating with one another.

We would also like to collect 3-5 flowers of each variety for RNA analysis. This analysis determines which genes are turned on/off and how the two varieties differ.

Depending on the results from the DNA analyses, we may also want to come back later in the summer to collect some seeds to further analyze mating patterns. This would require us to collect 10-20 seeds from 20-30 plants of each variety. As a single flower can produce 100-200 seeds this should have a minimal impact on these perennial plants.

Location:
Dr. Jeff Mitton of the University of Colorado, Boulder told us the following for the location of the var. daileyae plants:

Follow the road from the entrance to its terminus at the parking loop at Homestead Meadow and the trailhead for the Connector Trail. Start walking along the Connector Trail and within 150 to 200 meters you will pass a cabin (on the right, above the trail) used for picnics. Columbines start bout 50 yards past the cabin within 20 feet of the trail and plainly visible from the trail; they are among the aspen ramets. The population of columbines spreads for about 100 meters along the right hand (southern) side of the trail. The

Estimated Participants: 2   Estimated Spectators: 0
Hours:
   Mon. 06/24/2013: 7 AM - 9 PM
   Tue. 06/25/2013: 7 AM - 9 PM
   Wed. 06/26/2013: 7 AM - 9 PM
   Thu. 06/27/2013: 7 AM - 9 PM
   Fri. 06/28/2013: 7 AM - 9 PM

Attachments:

Additional Information Submitted by Applicant

1. Date Submitted: 06/04/2013
Certificate of Insurance

Reviewing Agency Comments/Status

Email the Citizen Information Coordinator regarding this application.

Parks & Open Lands

Status: Approved

Comments: 5/29/13: Application has been forwarded to area manager for review.
6/6/13: Fee Worksheet was emailed to you today. Your event is approved by our department upon receipt of signed worksheet and payment in full.
6/19/13 received signed worksheet, no fee needed
6/19/13 Approved

Email Parks & Open Lands

Risk Management

Status: Approved

Comments:

Email Risk Management

Final Disposition

Status: APPROVED

Please print your permit and have it available on event day.

Background Image: Rocky Mountain National Park by Sue Burke. All rights reserved.