Elk in Rocky Mountain National Park
 

Property Crime

Website on Statutes (Laws)

SENTENCING IN CRIMINAL CASES

Burglary
  • Statistics
    • In 2008, there were an estimated 2,222,196 burglaries-an increase of 2.0 percent when compared with 2007 data
    • Burglary accounted for 22.7 percent of the estimated number of property crimes committed in 2008.
    • Victims of burglary offenses suffered an estimated $4.6 billion in lost property in 2008; overall, the average dollar loss per burglary offense was $2,079.
    • Burglaries of residential properties accounted for 70.3 percent of all burglary offenses.

    Statistics provided by Office of Justice Programs: NCVRW Resource Guide and The Federal Bureau of Investigation 2008 Uniform Crime Report

  • The Law (if you would like to read sections of Colorado Statutes dealing with Burglary, click one of the following)
  • Resources
  • Frequently Asked Questions
Robbery
  • Statistics
    • During a one-year period 28 percent of youth ages 14 to 17 had experienced a property victimization (including robbery).
    • In 2008, an estimated $581 million worth of property was stolen during robberies reported to the police. The average dollar value of property stolen per robbery offense was $1,315.

    Statistics provided by Office of Justice Programs: NCVRW Resource Guide

  • The Law (if you would like to read sections of Colorado Statutes dealing with Robbery, click one of the following)
  • Resources
  • Frequently Asked Questions
Theft
  • Statistics
    • In 2007, 15 percent of violent crimes and 94 percent of property crimes resulted in economic losses from theft or damage.
    • Two-thirds of property crimes reported in 2008 were larceny-thefts, with the value of stolen property averaging $925 per offense. The total value of stolen property was an estimated $6.1 billion.

    Statistics provided by Office of Justice Programs: NCVRW Resource Guide

  • The Law (if you would like to read sections of Colorado Statutes dealing with Theft, click one of the following)
  • Resources
  • Frequently Asked Questions
Trespassing
Criminal Mischief
Fraud / Forgery
  • Statistics
    • In 2008, the incidence of identity fraud rose for the first time in five years, to nearly 10 million victims up from 8.1 million in 2007.
    • The Federal Trade Commission's Consumer Sentinel Network received over 1.2 million complaints in 2008: 52 percent on fraud, 26 percent on identity theft, and 22 percent about other matters.
    • In 2008, the FTC received 643,195 fraud complaints, with reported losses of more than $1.8 billion. The median loss was $440.
    • For all fraud complaints to the FTC in 2008, 63 percent of scammers made initial contact with the victim over the Internet (52 percent by e-mail and 11 percent through a Web site).Only 7 percent of first contacts were made by phone.
    • The largest group of fraud victims were ages 40 to 49 (26 percent). Eight percent of victims were age 60 or older.

    Statistics provided by Office of Justice Programs: NCVRW Resource Guide

  • The Law (if you would like to read sections of Colorado Statutes dealing with Fraud/Forgery, click one of the following)
  • Resources
  • Frequently Asked Questions
Identity Theft
  • Statistics
    • Of those who reported crimes to the Federal Trade Commission in 2008, people ages 60 and over made up 8 percent of fraud victims and 12 percent of identity theft victims.
    • In 2008, a lost or stolen wallet, checkbook, or credit card was the primary source of personal information theft in the 35 percent of cases where the victim could identify the source of data compromise.
    • Of identity theft cases where the perpetrator was identified, 13 percent were cases of "friendly theft," perpetrated by friends, family members, or in-home employees.
    • In 2006, 45 percent of identity theft victims discovered the misuse of information less than one month after the first occurrence. Sixty-nine percent of victims discovered it within the first year, and 11 percent of identity theft victims did not discover the crime for two to four years.
    • The largest groups of identity theft victims were ages 20 to 29 (24 percent) and 30 to 39 (23 percent). Twelve percent of victims were ages 60 and older.
    • In 2007, 17 percent of identity theft victims reported that the perpetrator had used their information in non-financial ways such as using the victim's name when caught committing a crime, using the victim's name to obtain government documents such as a driver's license or Social Security card, or using the victim's name to rent housing, obtain medical care, or file a fraudulent tax return.

    Statistics provided by Office of Justice Programs: NCVRW Resource Guide

  • The Law (if you would like to read sections of Colorado Statutes dealing with Identity Theft, click one of the following)
  • Resources
  • Frequently Asked Questions
Background Image: Rocky Mountain National Park by Sue Burke. All rights reserved.