Index: Health / Subcategory: Physical Health

Infant Mortality

Date updated: 09/26/2012

The infant mortality rate is measured as the deaths per 1,000 children during their first year of life divided by the number of live births. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the top five causes of infant deaths nationally in 2009 (latest data available) were:

  1. Congenital Anomalies
  2. Pre-Term/Low Birth Weight
  3. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
  4. Problems Related to Complications of Pregnancy
  5. Unintentional Injury

According to the Centers for Disease Control, [pdf], infant mortality is one of the most important indicators of the health of a nation, as it is associated with a variety of factors such as maternal health, quality and access to medical care, socioeconomic conditions, and public health practices.

Care should be taken in comparing infant mortality rates amongst countries because the methodology differs from country to country.

What this chart shows: Infant Mortality Rate in Colorado & Larimer County, 2002-2011

Data Source: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

See data table

What the above data tell us:

In 2011, there were 362 infant deaths in Colorado and 13 in Larimer County. The ten-year average rate of mortality (from 2002 to 2011) was higher for Colorado than for Larimer County (6.0 per 1,000 live births compared to 4.9 per 1,000).

In 5 of the 10 years shown above, Colorado did not meet the Healthy People 2020 objective of 6.0 deaths per 1,000 live births. In comparison, Larimer County did not meet the same objective in 3 of the 10 years shown.

What this chart shows: Infant Mortality Rate by Gender in Larimer County, 2002-2011

Data source: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

See data table

What the above data tell us:

In Larimer County, both male and female infant mortality rates have fluctuated over the last 10 years. Normally male infant mortality rates are slightly higher than female rates, but in Larimer County that was not the case in 2005, 2006 and 2007. One possible explanation is that the raw numbers in Larimer County are relatively low, so even slight deviations equate to higher percentages.

Although 51% of the live births in Larimer County in 2011 were males, they represented 62% of the infant deaths (see data table). Male infants are known to have a higher mortality rate than female infants, in part, because they are at higher risk for premature birth (National Center for Health Statistics).

Additional Information:

Related Information on COMPASS -

Other Resources -

Industry Standards or Targets:

Healthy People 2010

Healthy People 2020

Data Tables:

Infant Mortality Rate (Rate per 1,000)

 

Colorado

Larimer County

Total Deaths

Number Live Births

Infant Mortality Rate

Total Deaths

Number Live Births

Infant Mortality Rate

2002

413

68,420

6.0

16

3,298

4.9

2003

419

69,304

6.0

23

3,500

6.6

2004

432

68,475

6.3

12

3,370

3.6

2005

444

68,922

6.4

22

3,446

6.4

2006

404

70,737

5.7

16

3,542

4.5

2007

433

70,804

6.1

12

3,471

3.5

2008

434

70,028

6.1

22

3,491

6.2

2009

429

68,605

6.3

15

3,502

4.3

2010

392

66,346

5.9

16

3,361

4.8

2011

362

65,052

5.6

13

3,317

3.9

See chart

Infant Mortality Rate by Gender - Larimer County (Rate per 1,000)

 

Male

Female

Total Deaths

Number Live Births

Infant Mortality Rate

Total Deaths

Number Live Births

Infant Mortality Rate

2002

9 1,681 5.4 7 1,617 4.3

2003

13 1,845 7.0 10 1,655 6.0

2004

7 1,735 4.0 5 1,635 3.1

2005

11 1,773 6.2 11 1,673 6.6

2006

7 1,798 3.9 9 1,744 5.2

2007

6 1,824 3.3 6 1,647 3.6

2008

12 1,812 6.6 10 1,679 5.8

2009

8 1,775 4.5 7 1,727 4.1

2010

9 1,747 5.2 7 1,614 4.3

2011

8 1,690 4.7 5 1,627 3.1

See chart

Percentage of Live Births/Infant Deaths by Gender - Larimer County

 

 

Male

Female

% of Total
Live Births

% of Total Deaths

% of Total
Live Births

% of Total Deaths

2002

51% 56% 49% 44%

2003

53% 57% 47% 43%

2004

51% 58% 49% 42%

2005

51% 50% 49% 50%

2006

51%

44%

49% 56%

2007

53% 50% 47% 50%

2008

52% 55% 48% 45%

2009

51% 53% 49% 47%

2010

52% 56% 48% 44%

2011

51% 62% 49% 38%

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